3 Replies Latest reply: Aug 29, 2013 6:24 AM by jhill2 RSS

Do you know where your child is going online?

Jane Brown Master
Currently Being Moderated

Cautionary note: www.ask.fm is a site, with 6.3 million teen members many from Europe, where kids can host anonymously. It is a site becoming known for the cyberbullying that occurs on it and several resultant suicides.

 

Keep the family computer in a family room with the screen turned so you can see it. Talk to your child about what they are doing online. Sit with younger ones.

 

Do you know where your child is going online?

  • Re: Do you know where your child is going online?
    Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Lynne Hoffman has started a discussion, How do you teach digital citizenship? and there are several good recommendations provided there.

     

    A good suggestion for parents to help determine what their child is accessing online is to look at the browser history.  Secondary students may already know how to delete this or to empty the cache.  You may check this wiki for information on how to view the history in various browsers.

     

    Educators and parents need to be aware of how easy it is to have two browser windows open.  Kids will have the assignment they are working on visible whenever the 'adult' walks by and can quickly click into view another site that may not have anything to do with the assignment.  It is sometimes necessary to not only glance at working individuals but to actually use the mouse to move the window to see if there is another page open.  Less savvy folks may open a different tab, but then this is easy to spot if a student has multiple sites open.

  • Re: Do you know where your child is going online?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    This is such an important question for ALL parents/guardians to answer.  So many adults use digital devices as babysitters and trust that children are safe online.  It seems every day I read an article about a young person who has been victimized by an Internet predator.  We, as adults, have a huge responsibility to monitor children's online activity.  It's so easy to mistype a URL and be exposed to culture shock!

     

    As a teacher, I was amazed at how many parents were oblivious to what their children were posting online--inappropriate language, compromising pictures, too much personal information, and the list goes on!

     

    It's time we realize that children are vulnerable to an uncensored world on the Web.  Wake up parents!  Improve your technology skills and protect your children.  Don't let their knowledge of digital devices intimidate you or overwhelm you.  Children need your guidance and your wisdom!

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