9 Replies Latest reply: Jul 21, 2013 3:25 PM by Khorn RSS

What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?

Jane Brown Master
Currently Being Moderated

In Robert Kuttner's article "A Revolutionary Solution to Student Debt" (Huffinton Post, 7/14/2013) you can read how Oregon legislature is proposing to respond to the problem of student debt acquired pursuing their degree.  Do you think this is a solution?  What are the pros and cons?

  • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
    Khorn Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Jane:

    Thank you for bringing this timely article to our attention.  Certainly, the topic of paying for college is a salient one and will continue to be for sometime.  While I disagree with the author on many of his premises, he did provide accurate background for how our colleges and universities got so far out of control on tuition.  Because I started my college education at a Land Grant college, I have always been grateful for the quality education at lower cost. But, my own daughters are still struggling with Sallie Mae loans.

     

    I think this will be a very interesting pilot program.  It doesn't surprise me that it originates in Oregon as they have always liked to "think out of the box." But, my initial comments would be, what happens if the job market is as it has been the past few years and the "up-front" money needed to sustain cannot be raised? Which taxes will be raised in the state to cover the program? What happens if the job is lost and no income being earned?  Will the payments be deferred or cancelled until such time as employment is obtained again?  Is there going to be accelerated re-distribution of income?  Can these loans be paid off early without penalty? Will a program of this kind discourage some of the generous corporate scholarships available for academic achievement?

     

    These are but a few things that pop into my head at this moment, but one thing I feel strongly about is there is no place for the Federal Reserve in this program.  That is not the dual mandate placed on the FED and even though their recent bond-buying Qe's have pumped a lot of money into circulation, issuing "special bonds," would open up Pandora's box for other means of financing a state public debt.  States are struggling to get back into the black on their budgets and while it is brave of Oregon to at least give this program a look-see, the long-run potential could be costly for the state.

    • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
      Jane Brown Master
      Currently Being Moderated

      I had hopes that you would weigh in on this topic, Karen. I'm wondering, too, where Oregon will get the upfront monies and if jobs are not in a student's future then where does repayment funds come from.

       

      Instead of accepting that college educations are not valued anymore, at least Oregon is looking at solutions

       

      As I watch Detroit file for bankruptcy and knowing that states can do that, the money has to come from somewhere.

      • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
        Khorn Novice
        Currently Being Moderated

        You knew I would have to respond to such an interesting concept set-up to be "in the public good."

        You are so correct.  Sometimes I think that our entire society has forgotten that resources are limited and that includes money.

         

        Keep those challenging articles coming.  Go check out the San Jose' shut-down of Online courses.

        That's another interesting situation.  I'm beginning my hybrid class this coming fall.  In the process now of trying to put together a realistic, effective plan.  Mine is going to be a pilot also even though several other of our instructors have been teaching hybrids for a few semesters. My objective is to really integrate technology into this inspiring topic of economics.    I'm excited.  New adventure.


        • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
          lhurlbert New User
          Currently Being Moderated

          Do you have a link to the article on San Jose' shut-down of Online courses?

            • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
              lhurlbert New User
              Currently Being Moderated

              Thank you, Karen.  Whose fault is all of the fails.  It doesn't look like a bad thing or a final act for San Juan to suspend online courses for review.  We can't let online course teachers water down subjects.  At the same time not all students are ready to take an online course.

               

              If colleges doesn't want to teach to students taking their first online course then maybe every high school student should take at least one online course before graduation to see if it is a good fit for them. 

              • Re: What do you think of Oregon's "Pay it Forward" legislation?
                Khorn Novice
                Currently Being Moderated

                Sure wish I could answer that question, but my gut instinct says it is systemic.   It seemed to me after reading the article that San Jose Online program attracted a number of students not ready for college-level classes. The article wanted to target low-income students taking the course rather than all the remedial work that has to be done by our colleges and universities these days.  Hence, the problem.

                 

                Much of the research on preparation for college continues to indicate that our public schools K-12 are not getting the job done.   But, we shouldn't throw the baby out with the bath water.  Many of our public schools are doing an outstanding job so the research really needs to zero in on the statistics of competent end products as opposed to non-competent. As you are aware, there are many factors contributing to this fact.

                 

                I've noticed several high schools in this state offering Online classes and requiring that students prior to graduation enroll in at minimum of one course.

                 

                I still prefer teaching the face-to-face classes and will do so until the Online engulfs me by student demand.  This is the main reason I am transitioning to Hybrid classes because face-to-face enrollments are dropping as students stand in line to get into Online classes.  The vision of taking a literature class in pajamas any time during the day sure beats the heck out of getting to an 8:00 o'clock on campus.   My contention is that the substance isn't as rigorous in Online as face-to-face.  Much of the time spent Online is doing busy-work and not analytical work.  That, of course, depends on the design of the Online course and the competency of the instructor.

                 

                So, it appears that the paradigm is changing yet again, but like you, I congratulate San Jose' for stopping and taking note on a program that perhaps needs to be re-evaluated.

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