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  • 120. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    Jane Brown Master
    Currently Being Moderated

    Larry Ferlazzon writes about the Eight Things Skilled Teachers Think, Say, and Do  (October 2012) on ASCD: Educational Leadership.

     

    Here is a quote from the article, "Even if we can't always think, say, and do the ideal thing to strengthen struggling students' motivation, there's always something we can do to meet them halfway."

     

    Peaked your interest? Give this article a thorough read and let us know if there is something you might change about your teaching practices to help your students be more motivated toward learning.

  • 121. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    cmuller Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi Jane Brown,

     

    Thank you for sharing Larry Ferlazzon's article "Eight Things Skilled Teachers Think,Say, and Do" (October 2012 issue of ASCD:  Educational Leadership).  I enjoyed reading this article. I already use my students' interests and goals to help them learn.  I have always believed all students can learn. I also enjoyed William Glasser's quote about when students have more power they actually learn more.  I also agreed with Sparks, 2010 that students learn more when they are given choices about homework, assignments, and how they are grouped because they are more engaged and actively interested in their own achievements.  

     

    Christine Muller

  • 122. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    Rebecca LaBarca New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Motivating the unmotivated student is difficult.  Motivation skills should be taught at home but all to often parents are just not available.  Teaching today is much different then it was 20 or even 50 years ago.  Today teachers are expected to follow tons of standards while keeping every student engaged during every moment of the lesson.  Teachers are told not to "kick out" the disruptive student, to create multiple versions of the same lesson for all levels of learners, and the list goes on.  Motivating students requires that the teacher be excited about the content and be creative while planning.  The best way for teachers to become more motivated is to spend more time learning from other educators.  I learned about various games I can play with the kids to pass on the excitement.

  • 123. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    gentlegiant New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    you appeal to the limbic system like games and gaming do.

    ~instant or close to instant feedback.

    ~ change the grading system.. do not start at 100% only to see it go down.. this is sooo countermotivational for ALL students..start at 0 and go up.. all "questing" gets big or small awards depending... effort.  maddening!..~ just this alone might help.

    ~use game incentives to draw kids in../terminology.. it has been done.. find blogs on it.

    ~~has been proven to increase attendance, get rid of D.F students/increase grades~ and grow the class if it's an elective.

    ~also .. history classes.. LARPing, and reenactment of battles with the class.. naval warfare, European, Asian , American, great historical battles.. or makeup you own world planet.. and geography and use models for interactive diplomacy.. etc.  you will be surprised what the kids will be able to accomplish.  computer games such as Victoria.. turn based, not real time .. they have bits of info on leaders, tips on tactics/strategy.. the kids will be engaged as a game .. and the competition!

    types of governments, markets.. economics and how actions and reactions interconnect and affect the goals and arrangements.  long term/short term.

    soo much more..

    look up gamification of the classroom.. find more.

  • 124. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I motivate students by building off their strengths--no matter the level of significance of that/those strength(s).  Once I get the "buy-in" planted, then the student and I are able to move forward in a productive manner. However, as a private tutor, I'm working with a student who seems to respond more positive with me than his own mother. The high school student and I meet twice weekly and the goal is to complete the day's homework, study for upcoming exams, and work on other short/long term school assignments not directly related to the day's homework.  The problem I'm experiencing is the student and his lack of motivation at home during the three days he's not with me.  The student refuses to do any schoolwork on his non tutoring days and the results are recorded on his parent/student electronic account. It's apparent that all "missing assignments" are from non tutoring days.  According to the student's mother, she's tried everything to get her student to do his homework, but he refuses. Has anyone experienced such a case? If so, any advise? I'm new to the site, so if I'm not using it properly, please advise.  Thank you.

  • 125. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I motivate students by building off their strengths--no matter the level of significance of that/those strength(s).  Once I get the "buy-in" planted, then the student and I are able to move forward in a productive manner. However, as a private tutor, I'm working with a student who seems to respond more positive with me than his own mother. The high school student and I meet twice weekly and the goal is to complete the day's homework, study for upcoming exams, and work on other short/long term school assignments not directly related to the day's homework.  The problem I'm experiencing is the student and his lack of motivation at home during the three days he's not with me.  The student refuses to do any schoolwork on his non tutoring days and the results are recorded on his parent/student electronic account. It's apparent that all "missing assignments" are from non tutoring days.  According to the student's mother, she's tried everything to get her student to do his homework, but he refuses. Has anyone experienced such a case? If so, any advise? I'm new to the site, so if I'm not using it properly, please advise.  Thank you.

  • 126. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I motivate students by building off their strengths--no matter the level of significance of that/those strength(s).  Once I get the "buy-in" planted, then the student and I are able to move forward in a productive manner. However, as a private tutor, I'm working with a student who seems to respond more positive with me than his own mother. The high school student and I meet twice weekly and the goal is to complete the day's homework, study for upcoming exams, and work on other short/long term school assignments not directly related to the day's homework.  The problem I'm experiencing is the student and his lack of motivation at home during the three days he's not with me.  The student refuses to do any schoolwork on his non tutoring days and the results are recorded on his parent/student electronic account. It's apparent that all "missing assignments" are from non tutoring days.  According to the student's mother, she's tried everything to get her student to do his homework, but he refuses. Has anyone experienced such a case? If so, any advise? I'm new to the site, so if I'm not using it properly, please advise.  Thank you.

  • 127. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello readnow,

    First, welcome to Thinkfinity.  You have certainly used our discussion forum properly and responded to one of our most popular discussions.  The thread is really long, but members have offered some helpful suggestions in a number of cases. 

     

    Your dilemma probably sounds familiar to many teachers.  Getting students to complete work outside of class is always challenging in today's educational climate.  Students are bombarded with so many activities outside of school that academic work becomes a low priority.  You are obviously spending a lot of time working with this high school student two days a week.  So often parents have less success motivating their children than teachers do.  It's difficult to know what's happening in the home environment.

     

    Is there anyway the student could have a peer tutor on the other days or belong to a study group?  I am aware that some teachers dispense with homework assignments because the work is not done.  I don't think that is the best choice.

     

    A new trend in education is flipped learning which requires the students to complete most of their work outside of school and use the teacher as a facilitator while they are in school.  This may not be of any help with your student, but I like the idea that this method puts the responsibility of learning on the student which is where it should be.  You may want to check out some of these discussions:

     

    I hope others will see your question and offer some good advice.

     

    Thanks for your input,

    Lynne Hoffman

    Verizon Community Host

  • 128. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello Lynne,

     

    I'm new to Thinkfinity and apologize for the delay in responding to your post.  I appreciate the feedback you provided and have been looking into the "Flipped Classroom" as suggested. Is there a more "direct" way to find a library of "discussion" topics?  Please let me know.

     

    Thank you.

     

    Lucretia King

  • 129. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi Lucretia King,

    Again I appreciate your interest in the Thinkfinity Community.  In the upper right corner of the dark red navigation bar at the top of each page, you will see a box to enter keywords to search the Community.  We encourage those who start discussions to use tags that are useful in a search.  This is the best way to find discussion topics.  We don't have a search engine for discussions.

     

    We have three specific spaces with discussion forums devoted to Community members:

    • The Community Hub offers an opportunity to ask a question about education issues or Thinkfinity resources, or just read what others have to say on those topics.
    • Professional Development provides access to free webinars and other online learning opportunities from Verizon Thinkfinity and our partners to support your continued professional growth.  You are welcome to start a discussion or reply to an existing one to get the conversation going.
    • The Lounge is a space where you can relax, have a virtual cup of coffee, and discuss topics outside of education and technology.

     

    There is a Keyword search and a State Standards search in the Thinkfinity Resources widget on the right side of the Thinkfinity homepage that locates a wealth of resources provided by our Content Partners.  This is a wonderful tool for educators.

     

    We also have many groups that are open to members to share information on specific topics.  I encourage you to consider joining several of our popular groups:

     

    You may start your own group and include students if they are age 13+.

     

    We look forward to your continued contributions to the Community.

     

    Lynne

  • 130. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello Lynne,

     

    I appreciate your assistance. I'm exploring Thinkfinity throughout my day, and I'll will definitely click/explore the information you sent.  You're awesome!

     

    Thank you.

     

    Lucretia King

  • 131. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello Norman Thayer,

     

    Thanks for sharing your testimonial regarding your own son.  I just learned about the site you posted ("get real…") and ordered the book today.  The student I'm working with needs another way of understanding the reality between "learning and earning" as he's far from reality at this time. Unfortunately, this student, in my opinion, is experiencing the parent/child relationship in which the parenting style is more permissive, which has its own set of short and long term effects. It's the typical case of the parent satisfying more than the basic needs; all wants and desires are given at the drop of "Mother I want that!!!" It's very sad because this student truly believes his parent is going to be around forever and that his bills will always be taken care of. 

     

    As the student's private tutor, and I see him twice weekly, and the work we do is the only work the student turns in. On his non tutoring days, ALL homework (and other short/long-term assignments) are neglected. Mother is considering increasing the tutoring days at this time; however, I'm looking for new tools and strategies before agreeing to the increase. 

     

    Currently, this student is a high school freshman and is failing five out of six classes. I'm hopeful and will look forward to the book.

     

    If you have any specific recommendations, I look forward to your input.

     

    Again, thank you.

     

    Lucretia King

  • 132. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    cmuller Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi readnow,

    I had the exact "problem" with a middle school aged boy I tutored. He would not work on his work for his other teachers only worked on work with me. They ended up helping him list his assignments and then after I arrived he would go into a side classroom and work on everything with me. If I remember right English or Writing was done first then History and Science. 

  • 133. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello cmuller,

     

    Thanks for sharing your experience. 

     

    I have been up to my ears with my student who (still) lacks motivation.  He works well with me; however, he continues to neglect his work at home, and with this in mind, his mother "increased" his tutoring time just so we could get the work done.  The student and I meet four days a week.  In our first full week, though, the teacher (class) is working on Romeo and Juliet.  (I wish Shakespeare was not on the agenda at this time, but we're moving forward to the best of our abilities.)  Unfortunately, the student's reading skills are far below grade level, so our first full week has been a struggle.  Also, I have to rely on this student to "disclose all assignments," which has been the other battle.  Only two of the student's six subjects can be found on Edmodo, so I can gather homework some assignments using this platform.  Otherwise, I have to pull teeth to learn about other homework assignments.

     

    I've committed to 13 weeks with this student, which takes us to the end of the 2013/14 school term.  I'm hoping to make some progress with him before the end of the term.

     

    In the meantime, I welcome any suggestions you may have.

     

    Thank you.

     

    Lulu K

  • 134. Re: How do you motivate the unmotivated?
    readnow New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hello cmuller,

     

    As an addendum to my last post, I neglected to mention that I did receive the "Get Real Learning" material (recommended by a gentleman who responded to this topic), and I plan to use with my student. There's a lot of writing involved with the Get Real program, and with Shakespeare taking up so much of our time, I haven't been able to implement the program as designed.  However, I have been "orally" presenting bits and pieces of the program as an effort to get my student's attention.  For instance, my student truly believes his mother is always going to be around to take care of him, and the program helps students understand the "human lifecycle" and how there is an end as some point.  I've been posing "hypotheticals" with my student, which gets his attention, and the answers he provides truly confirm his immaturity.  What I mean by this is:  This student believes his mother is going to live forever.  He's never been to a funeral, and I was able to confirm this with his mother.  Mother's explanation is: She shielded him from family funerals because "she" thought such an event would be too scary for her son. I could go on, but I think you get the picture. 

     

    I wish you well with your middle school student. 

     

    Lulu K.

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