7 Replies Latest reply: Apr 6, 2013 8:41 PM by mwedwards RSS

How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?

Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
Currently Being Moderated

With the idea of flipping classrooms becoming popular among educators, what do you think of flipping faculty meetings? 

 

Do these statistics surprise you?  "Most professionals who meet on a regular basis admit to daydreaming (91%), missing meetings (96%), or missing parts of meetings (95%). A large percentage (73%) said they have brought other work to meetings and some (39%) said they have dozed during meetings."  (taken from Flipping Your Faculty Meetings--an article by Nancy Caramanico in the Tech & Learning Magazine February 2013)

 

The statistics above were compiled from a business setting, but as educators, we probably would find similar percentages if we polled colleagues at faculty meetings.  So could the flipped faculty meeting be the solution to a more engaging and creative meeting?

 

In her article, Caramanico provides a checklist for flipping faculty meetings.  She suggests sharing a video, articles, documents, and other important information in advance of the meeting.  When the teachers gather for meetings at school, they already have ideas to discuss and ways to implement new initiatives.  Little time is wasted with extraneous conversation! 

 

Caramanico also discusses 10 tools for flipping the faculty meeting:

 

Do you think flipping faculty meetings would be a time-saver for teachers?  How do you feel about suggesting that your school investigate the possibility of flipping faculty meetings?  What are the pros and cons of flipping faculty meetings?

  • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
    Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    When I worked in an elementary school, I was constantly frustrated by the practice of information being read to the group.  Had we been given the opportunity to read and digest the information beforehand, I'm sure there would have been good discussion.  However, there seemed to be an attitude that you couldn't guarantee that everyone would read the information on their own. I always wondered how you could guarantee that everyone was listening when they were supposed to be.

  • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
    svreeland New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I hate being read to! I always felt that they should just give me the power point, articles, or information ahead of time. Then we can use face time for discussion of the material. You have no guarantee that people will read it; however, the TED system TED-Ed | Line Plot Graphs allows you to ask and answer question about the material. At least that way there is some accountability for having seen it. Also, I noticed that when my students click on video links on Edmodo, I am notified. Again, at least I know they looked at it.

  • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
    amfgordon New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I think it's interesting that faculty meetings are primarily used it seems for dissementating information and little time is utilized for professional learning. Do you think this is the case? Many of these flipped tools could be used for this information and then more opportunities for collaboration, planning and learning could take place in these time frames. Any thoughts?

    • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
      Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
      Currently Being Moderated

      In my school district, the monthly 'facutly' meetings have become professional development sessions especially with Common Core implementation right around the corner.  We look to our department heads and/or team leaders to provide the information the principal shares at leadership meetings.

    • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
      mwedwards Novice
      Currently Being Moderated

      We have begun changing our department meetings to make them more of a learning experience. We used to go around and room/table and everyone shared what was going on with their projects (most people did not have much to say) and then we would listen to a list of dates and information covered in other meetings.

      Recently we have started sending any info we want to share with the whole group to one person and that one person pulls that information together and shares it with the rest of the group (we used to use google docs but are now using our edmodo group more). Then we are able to spend our weekly meetings working and learning together rather than listening (or supposedly listening) to an ongoing list. We are also able to look back and refer to what has been shared rather than depending on the memories and interpretations of people,

  • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
    anitaw New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I think it's an excellent idea.  Time is a critical element in education.  We NEVER have enough of it.  If faculty meetings were used for professional development and other information was shared through video, I believe it would be a more efficient use of our time.  The big issues would be whether or not teachers would actually watch the videos and how to document it.

  • Re: How would you like flipping your faculty meetings?
    Jane Brown Master
    Currently Being Moderated

    Go on a Meeting Diet!

     

    Meetings help get everyone on the same page, but they sap productivity. Meeting after meeting means weekends become work days and work days, full of meetings, create meeting fatigue. Instead of attending meetings with no agenda and no searchable record of actions assigned or decisions made, commit to syncing up in a Thinkfinity group and change the way you work.

     

    Imagine being able to access any conversation, document, idea, or person in your school, from anywhere, at any time. Information is searchable even months later, even if the teacher who created it is no longer with the school. Team members can be on boarded more quickly because they have access to what they need, when they need it, in a central place.

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