5 Replies Latest reply: Mar 2, 2013 11:24 AM by Jeanne Rogers RSS

What do you think of Response To Intervention (RTI)? Have you ever used it?

cmuller Novice
Currently Being Moderated

I found a blog post to share on WeARETeachers.com on how RTI can boost standardized test scores.  Check out The Teacher Report: How RTI Boosts Standardized Test Scores by Jennifer Prescott (January 23, 2013) and read about intervention techniques to help each child reach his/her greatest potential.  Prescott has included 5 suggestions for getting the most from an RTI program in an effort to raise test scores.

 

 

What do you think of RTI?  Have you ever used it?

Have students' standardized test scores improved with the help of the RTI program in your school?

 

 


 

  • Re: What do you think of Response To Intervention (RTI)? Have you ever used it?
    iteach45 New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I really like the RTI model and have used it in two different schools. 

     

    Some of the features that I like:  Small groups of students getting instruction depending on level and area of need, benchmark testing to see who needs it and who does not, and also benchmark testing allows you to see who needed it when they started and where they are as you test throughout the year.  I worked in a school with a high population of low income students.  At the beginning of the year we had nearly 40% of students coming in as "significant risk" and at the end only 5.  I'll say it worked!

     

    I continue to do it at my current school.  The population is different but the results are still fantastic!  I swear by it.

     

    Why wait for intervention?  All that happens is more students ending up on IEPs and the gaps are usually very large by the time they are "labeled" disabled.  It's all about intervening as soon as possible.

  • Re: What do you think of Response To Intervention (RTI)? Have you ever used it?
    Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Thanks for recommending this article.  We use RTI in my school district and I've seen an adjustment in teacher attitude regarding providing interventions to all.  So often we have kids with IEP's and 504's and they require additional assistance, leaving other kids to struggle on their own.  By having a model like RTI, it addresses the needs of these students.  That's a great thing!

     

    In our middle schools, we have a recovery program.  In the past, students who 'failed' a quarter were assisted to make work up.  However, a large number of students would wait to 'recover' during a 10 day extended school year time.  It hasn't been effective and a change is in the future.  Looks like a successful model will provide 'recovery' opportunities immediately and 'just in time' to be of more help to students. I'll be eager to hear how it goes for next year.

    • Re: What do you think of Response To Intervention (RTI)? Have you ever used it?
      cmuller Novice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Hi Jeanne Rogers,

       

      Thank you for your response.  Please tell me more about the Recovery Program in your middle schools.  It sounds like you have a good RTI program that addresses the students needs.  Do you use their interests?

       

      Christine Muller

      • Re: What do you think of Response To Intervention (RTI)? Have you ever used it?
        Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
        Currently Being Moderated

        The information I've read about RTI has indicated that it is a way to be sure kids are not labeled in an effort to "get services."  Too many kids carry a label and they may have been assisted with interventions.

         

        The Recovery Program identifies students who are failing a class and works with the students to assist them in raising their grade.  In the past, the program has had one teacher who would meet regularly with the students.  Sometimes phone calls home to provide weekly updates, or to remind students of assignments has been an adequate intervention.  At times, the teacher would tutor students on the skills they lacked to be successful in class.  The success of the program was seen by the number of students who were passing classes.

         

        It appears a big change coming is that the recovery attempts will not be made AFTER a student fails, but the student will receive help immediately upon identifying that there is a problem.  Perhaps a student misses handing in two homework assignments.  The student will redo the work, under the supervision of the recovery teacher.  Work will be turned in to the teacher and must be scored a C or higher to be acceptable.Yet, the student will only receive a D.  Apparently, the idea is that the student will see that they are doing the work anyways, so why not do it right the first time.

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