Currently Being Moderated

Literacy Activities on Astronauts and Space Travel

tengrrl Posted by tengrrl in Reading & Language Arts on Aug 26, 2012 3:24:50 AM

Farewell, Neil Armstrong (1930 - 2012). Apollo 11 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base. Image taken by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong during the Apollo 11 Mission. Armstrongs shadow is visible in foreground. Credit: NASAYesterday, Neil Armstrong, the first human to step foot on the moon passed away.  We’re posting resources today that you can use in class to honor the life and achievements of Neil Armstrong—as well as the legacy of Sally Ride, and the current exploration of the planet Mars with NASA’s Curiosity rover.

 

I’ve gathered materials on the ReadWriteThink site and from our Thinkfinity partners that fit three broad categories:

  • Resources focused directly on Space Exploration
  • Biographical and historical materials you can use to explore the life of Armstrong (or any astronaut or scientist)
  • Family activities that relate to Space Exploration

The materials range from mini-lessons to complete units and cross the grade levels. So read on, and celebrate what the Star Trek series has proclaimed as “Space—The Final Frontier.”


Focused on Space Exploration


Biographies and History

  • Guided Comprehension in Action: Teaching Summarizing With the Bio-Cube
    Middle-level students learn the ins and outs of writing biographies by researching an astronaut or scientist and writing a summary of his or her life.

  • A Biography Study: Using Role-Play to Explore Authors’ Lives
    Secondary students read biographies and explore websites of selected American authors and then role-play as the authors. Adapt this lesson to ask students to consider space pioneers like Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Sally Ride.
  • Biographies: Creating Timelines of a Life
    Elementary students explore a number of sources to create a biographical timeline about a selected person. Students collaboratively research and resolve conflicting information they find during their investigation.

  • Acrostic Poems
    Have students write acrostic poems about Neil Armstrong, one of the scientists working on the Curiosity mission, or another person who explores outer space with the Acrostic Poem tool.


Family Activities on Space Exploration

  • Blast Off to Learn New Words
    Boost vocabulary by taking an imaginary trip into space. After a lunar “landing,” children return to Earth with a galaxy of new words.

  • Mars Hotel
    Tap interest in the Curiosity mission with Science NetLinks’ 60-second Science Update.  When the Apollo astronauts went to the moon, the trip took only about three days. A trip to Mars, on the other hand, would take many months—and space travel isn’t known for its luxuries.

  • How Will Future Astronauts Travel To Outer Space?
    Where do you think the next frontier in space exploration is? What type of spacecraft would we need to get there? Put your imagination and your artistic talents to the test with this challenge from Wonderopolis.

 

If you have feedback or questions about ReadWriteThink, all you have to do is contact us.

 

—Traci Gardner

 

 

[Photo: Farewell, Neil Armstrong (1930 - 2012). Apollo 11 Mission image - View of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base. Image taken by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong during the Apollo 11 Mission. Armstrongs shadow is visible in foreground. Credit: NASA by NASA Goddard Photo and Video, on Flickr]

Comments

Filter Blog

By author: By date:
By tag: